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Posts Tagged ‘Stanford’

Stanford Engineers Create a Jumping and Gliding Robot Inspired by a Flying Fish

May 29th, 2013

flying fish, stanford, robot, glider, aircraft, jumpPhoto via Shutterstock

When it comes to energy efficient dynamics, engineers know that gliding is the best way to move. From giant jellyfish to manta rays, researchers have already seen that minimal motion can be a great advantage to propulsion. Scientists at Stanford have created a small robot inspired by a flying fish that can travel through the air farther than a “ballistic jumping” machine. The aircraft can also adjust its launch angle depending on the surface to move and land gracefully without having to sacrifice distance.

flying fish, stanford, robot, glider, aircraft, jump flying fish, stanford, robot, glider, aircraft, jump

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Post tags: aircraft, flying fish, Glide, glider, jellyfish, jump!, jumpglider, manta ray, proformance, robot, stanford university, wing

    




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Stanford Scientists Create the World’s First Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells

December 22nd, 2012

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Solar cells image via Shutterstock

Instead of rigid, cumbersome flat solar panels, you could soon be powering your home and electronics with a sticker. Engineers at Stanford have successfully fabricated thin, flexible solar cells that are able to be peeled and attached to almost any surface. The new technology is described in the December 20th issue of Scientific Reports and details how the team of scientists led by Xiaolin Zheng and Chi Hwan Lee achieved such a remarkable breakthrough. In addition to being dynamic, the peel-and-stick process also reduces cost and weight, making the cells an attractive alternative to their uncompromising relatives.

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peel and stick solar cell, solar power, stanford, engineering, thin, flexible

The team at Stanford were able to create their cell by making a silicon dioxide “sandwich”. First, a 300-nanometer film of nickel is placed on a silicon dioxide wafer. Thin film solar cells are then added on the nickel layer, and coated with a protective polymer. Then, a layer of thermal release tape is added to the top of the cells to help with their transfer from the hard wafer. To remove the newly formed cell, the wafer is submerged in water at room temperature while the thermal release tape is peeled back, allowing water to come into contact with the silicon dioxide and nickel. Now the cell is free from its hard substrate but still attached to the tape. The tape is heated at 90°C for several seconds, and can afterwards be attached to any surface. In the final step, the thermal release tape is removed, leaving the cell stuck to its new home.

Amazingly, the team was able to accomplish their new process without sacrificing efficiency or making any great modifications to existing methods or materials, making them already commercially viable. There is also no waste, as the silicon wafer remains clean and undamaged and can be reused after the cells are removed. They are also lightweight and use low-cost. Combined with thin film electronics, the new cells could help power a whole new set of wearable technologies that incorporate printed circuitry and LCD displays.

+ Stanford School of Engineering

Via ScienceDaily

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Stanford MBA price tag hits record $185,000

December 7th, 2012
The total cost to attend Stanford's prestigious business school has jumped by $18,242 in just two years, besting Columbia as the world's most expensive MBA program.


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Stanford Scientists Create Self-Healing Material That Responds To Touch

November 13th, 2012

Standford University Department of Electrical Engineering, Self-Healing material, touch sensitive material, synthetic skin, prosthetic technology, Zhenan Bao

Human skin is an amazing barrier that is able to sense pressure and heal itself. Now, researchers at Stanford University’s Department of Electrical Engineering have created a material that mimics skin in two incredible ways: it can sense pressure and it can heal cuts or tears. While previous attempts at producing synthetic skins have yielded materials that can only heal themselves under high heat or just one time, this latest material, like skin, can heal at room temperature an unlimited number of times. Additionally, the material can conduct electricity, an essential component lacking in previous synthetic skin materials.

Standford University Department of Electrical Engineering, Self-Healing material, touch sensitive material, synthetic skin, prosthetic technology, Zhenan Bao Standford University Department of Electrical Engineering, Self-Healing material, touch sensitive material, synthetic skin, prosthetic technology, Zhenan Bao


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New e-skin is sensitive to touch and self-healing

November 12th, 2012
Chemists and engineers at Stanford say their synthetic material could help produce smarter prosthetics and resilient personal electronics that self-repair. [Read more]



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Stanford’s New Grid-Scale Battery Can Last for 1,000 Charge Cycles Without Degrading

October 25th, 2012

solar panels, renewable energy, battery, electricity, grid, clean energy

The world just got one step closer to renewable, cheap, and efficient large-scale energy production as researchers at Stanford University lead by engineer Yi Cui developed a grid-scale battery whose electrodes can last for up to a thousand charge cycles without degrading. The new battery is heralded as a game-changer for fluctuating renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.

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Post tags: anode, battery, cathode, electrodes, hexacyanoferrate, renewable energy, stanford university, yi cui



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Facebook hackathon shows off the Zuckerbergs of tomorrow

October 13th, 2012
Stanford University and UC Berkeley students are partying tonight at the social network's headquarters -- coder style. [Read more]



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For sale: MBA essays from successful applicants

October 3rd, 2012
A new startup is peddling more than 200 essays at $50 a pop for many top schools, including Harvard, Stanford, Columbia and Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management.


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Researcher says 100,000 passwords exposed on IEEE site

September 25th, 2012
Info on workers at Apple, Google, NASA, Stanford, and elsewhere was easily accessible owing to an oversight by the association for tech pros, a computer scientist in Denmark says. [Read more]


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Technology To Democratize Education

September 17th, 2012
About a mile from the main quad at Stanford University, one of the nation's bastions of exclusive and expensive higher education, a street-level office building across the street from an Olive Garden houses the makings of an up-and-coming contender.

In this version of education, learning will be free and available to anyone who wants it while operating like a whimsical playground: No one is late for class, failure is not an option, and a lesson looks something like Angry Birds, the physics-based puzzle game that has been downloaded more than 1 billion times.

"You want learning to be as much fun as it is to play a video game," says Sebastian Thrun, a Google vice president and Stanford research professor best known for his role in building Google's driverless car.

Thrun, 45, is seated in a cramped, soundproof studio at Udacity, the education company he founded in January after teaching a free online artificial-intelligence course that drew more than 160,000 students. So profound was the experience that he announced he could no longer teach in a traditional Stanford classroom.

"I feel like there's a red pill and a blue pill," he famously told an audience in January at the Digital-Life-Design conference in Munich. "And you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I've taken the red pill, and I've seen Wonderland."

Now, Udacity is one of a rush of online start-ups he oversees. The vision across these ventures: Develop a catalog of free online courses taught by star professors from around the world.

In this windowless room, producers create cool special effects, and video cameras capture tight shots of an instructor's hand as it writes diagrams and figures on a white board. In the next room, a dozen or so of Thrun's staff of twentysomethings are...



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